Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Leading Part 1

In this video Caroline answers a question about her method and position for leading a horse with safety asked by Sharon.

Each week we will be answering your questions.  You can send your questions to info@riderhorsemanship.com, or ask them here as a response to the blog.

Monday, December 13, 2010

Hi there!
As we started up this blog, it was our intention to do a short video each week in response to people's questions, but it has been hovering around 32 degrees and windy for the last two weeks!  Brrrrr!  So no videos right now!  

We do however want to post 1 - 3 answers to questions every Monday, whether in written or video form.

Here is Caroline's response to Anna's question from last week:

Hi Anna,
The round penning approach will help you build deep levels of acceptance and trust. This way of mindfully working with our horses enables us to forge a level of awareness when reading and listening to our horses. It also begins the foundation for deep connection of the heart, mind and body. The better you become at reading what your horses tells you, and then knowing what to do with that information and feedback, the deeper your relationship will be. Once he accepts and trusts you he will try and partner up. This is when you show him the halter and ask, not force, him to trust you as you gently, slowly present the halter.

My 2nd dvd, online ground exercises goes through the haltering, leading etc. I have developed sequels to the first 3 and they specifically delve into problem solving.

Good luck and keep me posted!
My best,

Friday, December 3, 2010

A forum for Questions and Answers!

Hello!  We'd like to open up this blog to be a forum for your questions and answers.  While there unfortunately aren't enough hours in the day for Caroline to get to each of your questions personally, she will be picking at least one question a week to answer here.  We will answer some of them with a video too!

So please post us your questions here!

These answers will have to be somewhat general, because without seeing you with your horse, we can't know exactly what is going on.  If you would like a tailored and specific answer to your question that is just for you and your horse, please go to this link to learn more about assessments and evaluations, both in person, and via video!


Here is a question we got from Anna from CT:

Hey, my name is Anna. I'm 18 from CT. I saw you at the Equine Affaire in MA and now you are my idol. I love the way you work with your horses. I got your round penning dvd but my horse isn't responding to it well, probably because I'm not sure what I'm doing. I just got a wild Mustang and hope to have the same relationship with him as you have with your horses. Right now I'm working on getting a halter on him. He's ok with the nose band but scared of the strap going over his head. Do you have any suggestions on how I should go about doing this? And what should I do about training him to lead. Any input would be appreciated!


Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Welcome to The Tao of Horsemanship Blog!

Approach vs Technique...

There are a lot of techniques for working with horses out there, and technique is important. You've got to have tools in your toolbox! A barn doesn't get built with your intention, you have to use your tools to bring your intention into being. But knowing when and how to use each tool will have a lot of impact on your end result! With horses it's even more complicated, because a board is a board, and a saw is a saw, but a horse - well they are all different. No one technique is going to bring the same results with every horse. How it is used is what makes the difference.

Most people teach technique - but when it comes down to it, it is the way that technique is applied that can make or break us with our horses. When we work with our horses, there is so much finesse involved. Caroline speaks of knowing "when to be, where to be, and why" and to "work with the horse that presents itself". Learning when, where, and why is the beginnings of the tao of horsemanship. Those are the true gems that we, as students of the horse are seeking, to learn to be better at communicating and partnering with our horses.

In this video, Caroline describes how she defines the difference between approach and technique, and how she combines the two when working with horses, and teaching others.

We'd love to hear your responses!